UPDATE: Reactions to Michigan suing Flint for not approving water deal

LANSING, Mich. (AP) – Mayor Karen Weaver issued the following statement Wednesday after the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality filed suit against the City of Flint as a result of City Council’s refusal to approve the Mayor’s water source recommendation:

“I am aware of the suit filed by the MDEQ today. While disappointing that the state and federal government are now involved in making a decision we as City leaders should be making for Flint, I cannot say that I am surprised. We were notified that legal action would be a consequence of Council choosing not to meet the requirements set before them to approve a long-term water source for Flint. The recommendation I put forward months ago is the best option to protect public health and is supported by the public health community.
The recommendation I proposed would also allow the City to avoid a projected 40 percent water rate increase and ensure the City of Flint gets millions of dollars to continue replacing lead tainted pipes and make much-needed repairs to our damaged infrastructure so we are able to deliver quality water to residents. The people of Flint have waited long enough for a reliable, permanent water source. Implementing my recommendation will provide that, and will allow us to move forward as a community and focus more on rebuilding our City.”

Original Story:

Lansing, MICH. (WLNS) – The latest updates on the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality filing suit against the City of Flint.

10:50 a.m.

The state of Michigan is suing Flint, alleging that the city council’s failure to approve a recommendation to buy water long term from a Detroit-area system is endangering a public already troubled by a lead-tainted water crisis.

The lawsuit was filed Wednesday in federal court.

The state Department of Environmental Quality had previously threatened legal action if the council did not approve Mayor Karen Weaver’s recommendation or a reasonable alternative by Monday.

The council instead approved a short-term extension of its contract with the Great Lakes Water Authority, against the wishes of Mayor Karen Weaver, who is backing a 30-year contract.

State and federal officials do not want Flint to change water sources a third time after a fateful 2014 switch resulted in lead contamination and other issues while the city was under state management.

___

6:35 a.m.

A state-appointed financial board says Flint can’t block a plan that puts about 8,000 property owners at risk of losing homes due to unpaid water and sewer bills.

Plans for the tax liens on properties across Flint drew protests this year amid the city’s crisis with lead-tainted water. Flint City Council in May approved a one-year moratorium on the liens to give officials time to determine how to handle the issue.

The Receivership Transition Advisory Board struck down the resolution Tuesday. Board Chairman Frederick Headen says Flint needs money from tax liens – especially after City Council didn’t approve a long-term water contract with the Great Lakes Water Authority.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver said Tuesday she disagrees with the board and will defy its decision by essentially continuing the moratorium.

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