Influenza and Norovirus starting later than normal this year

chickenpox vaccination
FILE - In this April 20, 2012, file photo, nurse Catherine Craige draws a chickenpox vaccination in Berlin, Vt. Vermont parents who don't want their kids vaccinated can take a "philosophical exemption" for the last time in 2015, as Vermont became the first state to do away with the philosophical exemption. Lawmakers left the religious exemption intact. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)

(WLNS) – Flu season is just starting up and Health Officials say the more prepared you are, and earlier you get vaccinated, the better off you will be down the road.

Generally Flu season would have already been in full swing but the CDC is predicting more flu cases to start popping up around Mid-February this year.

Another Virus that will start up around this time as well is the Norovirus, a gastro-intestinal virus, that has no vaccination available to prevent catching it.

Ingham County Health Department health officials tell 6 News the best way to stay safe from either virus is staying home and resting when you start feeling unwell, and washing your hands as much as possible.

Flu vaccinations do take a week or two to fully set in, so the earlier you get vaccinated, the better your chances are at not catching the virus.

For people who can’t seem to find time to get a vaccination, Lansing Urgent Care near Frandor is now staying open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to make sure everyone who needs medical attention, is not without care.

Flu prevention suggestions from the CDC:

1. Avoid close contact.
Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

2. Stay home when you are sick.
If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.

3. Cover your mouth and nose.
Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.

4. Clean your hands.
Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

6. Practice other good health habits.
Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

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